"Maharlika - is a Filipino term meaning “nobility” or “free people”. Its etymology is rooted from the Sanskrit maharddhika which means “a man of wealth, knowledge, and ability”. During ancient times in the Philippines, the word maharlika referred to the nobility class in Philippine society who are also known to be warriors." Wikipedia
malacanan:

TODAY IN HISTORY: Today is the 153rd birth anniversary of Jose Rizal.
In response to a bloody revolution, Rizal had this to say: “The pen is mightier than the sword.” By no means a pacifist, our National Hero more than deserves the title not just because of his patriotic achievements, but because he dared to imagine a different reality for his country.
After all, those who lack imagination cannot possibly imagine what is lacking. Thank you, Jose Rizal, who lived and died for his imagination.
Today’s question then remains: Do you still dream for your country?
Revisit the Official Gazette’s 2013 page on the centenary of the Rizal monument in Luneta.

malacanan:

TODAY IN HISTORY: Today is the 153rd birth anniversary of Jose Rizal.

In response to a bloody revolution, Rizal had this to say: “The pen is mightier than the sword.” By no means a pacifist, our National Hero more than deserves the title not just because of his patriotic achievements, but because he dared to imagine a different reality for his country.

After all, those who lack imagination cannot possibly imagine what is lacking. Thank you, Jose Rizal, who lived and died for his imagination.

Today’s question then remains: Do you still dream for your country?

Revisit the Official Gazette’s 2013 page on the centenary of the Rizal monument in Luneta.

(via fyfilipinopride)

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thebrainscoop:

thebrainscoop:

This scale armor is made from sliced and hammered buffalo horn sheaths. YEAH. From the anthropological collections.

Further information on this artefact provided by Jamie Kelly, collections manager of Anthropology from The Field Museum: 
Carabao horn Moro armor from Mindanao, Philippines 

More photos from The Field Museum’s 10,000 Kwentos site.

Please view all the photos and comment on them, especially if you have knowledge of what that artifact is, where you have seen it, what it is made of, what does its design or colors mean, or any context to better understand the story of the artifact. Comments are moderated and open to anyone. Thanks so much for helping ’10,000 stories come to life’.

pag-asaharibon:

thebrainscoop:

thebrainscoop:

This scale armor is made from sliced and hammered buffalo horn sheaths. YEAH. From the anthropological collections.

Further information on this artefact provided by Jamie Kelly, collections manager of Anthropology from The Field Museum: 

Carabao horn Moro armor from Mindanao, Philippines

More photos from The Field Museum’s 10,000 Kwentos site.

Please view all the photos and comment on them, especially if you have knowledge of what that artifact is, where you have seen it, what it is made of, what does its design or colors mean, or any context to better understand the story of the artifact. Comments are moderated and open to anyone. Thanks so much for helping ’10,000 stories come to life’.

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

manila:

The Lapu-Lapu Monument in Luneta

Lapu-Lapu’s statue is situated in the middle of Agrifina Circle, looking towards the sea and almost mirroring Rizal’s monument. It was crafted by noted sculptor Juan Sajid Imao, whose parents hail from Sulu and Marikina City. Imao was named one of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of the Philippines in 2001. Despite slowly losing his eyesight, he still managed to complete the statue. (source)
Other Lapu-Lapu monuments are in Mactan and Cebu (Heritage of Cebu Monument).
See also: 
Lapu-Lapu’s monument and Philippine media
The Faces of Lapu-Lapu Project
Guillermo Tolentino’s Datu Lapu-Lapu
Tanday Lupalupa not “Lapu-Lapu” 

pag-asaharibon:

manila:

The Lapu-Lapu Monument in Luneta

Lapu-Lapu’s statue is situated in the middle of Agrifina Circle, looking towards the sea and almost mirroring Rizal’s monument. It was crafted by noted sculptor Juan Sajid Imao, whose parents hail from Sulu and Marikina City. Imao was named one of the Ten Outstanding Young Men of the Philippines in 2001. Despite slowly losing his eyesight, he still managed to complete the statue. (source)

Other Lapu-Lapu monuments are in Mactan and Cebu (Heritage of Cebu Monument).

See also: 

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

Pekiti Tirsia Kali Elite-Brooklyn, founded in 2010, is open to all students and promotes the indigenous Filipino martial art, Pekiti Tirsia Kali. Pekiti Tirsia is a family system that was developed by the Tortal Family in the province of Negros Occidental in the late 1800’s. Based on tactics and strategies derived from edged weapons, Pekiti Tirsia is a complete system that incorporates both weapons and empty hands methods designed for both single and multiple attackers. In 1972, the heir and custodian of the system, Grandtuhon Leo T. Gaje, introduced it to the United States, in New York City. The current instructors from Pekiti Tirsia Kali Elite-Brooklyn continue to train with Grandtuhon Gaje and his nephew (Tuhon Rommel Tortal) and continue to teach the traditions, culture, and art incorporated with and peripheral to the martial art system. 

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

Gov’t to turn Bonifacio War Tunnel into museum

State-owned Bases Conversion and Development Authority (BCDA) said it would develop Bonifacio War Tunnel into a historical museum and tourist site.

BCDA recently signed a memorandum of agreement with the Tourism Infrastructure and Enterprise Zone Authority (TIEZA), National Historical Commission of the Philippines (NHCP) and the National Museum to preserve the Bonifacio War Tunnel and develop it into a tourism site. 

Under the agreement, TIEZA will provide the funds to complete the two phase of the project. For Phase 1, a budget of P4 million has been allocated and approved by the TIEZA’s mother agency the Department of Tourism.

The first phase will involve a feasibility study that aims to, among others, prepare the rehabilitation plan, marketing plan and study, as well as an operations plan. Phase 2 will involve the rehabilitation and development of the war tunnel as a museum.

“Our objective is to preserve the Bonifacio War Tunnel as a historical structure and to develop it into a tourism site that would complement Fort Bonifacio’s rich historical heritage,” BCDA president Arnel Paciano D. Casanova said.

The NHCP will issue a certification that the tunnel is an important cultural property (ICP). It will also process the possible declaration of the tunnel as a national historical site.

Similarly, the National Museum will provide technical assistance in the implementation of the project, and in preparing the operational plan of the museum.

Both the NHCP and National Museum will also provide technical assistance in drafting the terms of reference.

The Bonifacio War Tunnel is located along the eastern portion of Bonifacio Global City (BGC).  BGC used to be part of Fort Bonifacio, or what used to be called Fort McKinley. The tunnel was constructed by the Americans on October 15, 1941 in preparation for the anticipated invasion by Japan.

The Japanese expanded the tunnel during their occupation of the Philippines, using the tunnel as a bomb shelter against American air raids from October 1944 to March 1945.

Fort McKinley was later transferred to the Philippine government after the country gained independence from the Americans in 1949. The fort was renamed Fort Bonifacio and became the headquarters of the Philippine Army.

Of the original full 2.2 kilometers length of the tunnel, an estimated 730 meters remain unaffected by the development of Fort Bonifacio as of 2013. 

(Source: interaksyon.com, via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

The Manila-Acapulco Galleons by Shirley Fish

During the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries, the transpacific treasure galleons sailed annually from Manila to Acapulco. In Manila, the vessel was loaded with the scented spices of the East, luxurious silks from China, exquisite hand crafted lacquerware from Japan and a multitude of Oriental goods that the Spaniards of New Spain longed to own. The returning galleon from Acapulco to Manila, carried as much as 2.5 million silver pesos in payment of the goods sent to the New Spain in the previous year, as well as a yearly silver subsidy of 250,000 reales for the maintenance of the colonial government in the Philippines. But while the galleons mainly sailed alone and unaccompanied from Manila to Acapulco and vice versa, they were vulnerable to a host of calamities and misfortunes. A fire on board the vessel or a terrifying storm could end the voyage and the lives of every one on the ship even before the galleon was able to reach land. Additionally, the commanders of the galleons were always threatened by lurking pirates and privateers who prayed on the vessels and coveted the treasures they carried. The book describes in detail how the galleons were attacked at sea and how they fought against enemy vessels, as well as how many of the ships sank or were shipwrecked over the years. It also covers their management, construction, manning, weaponry, navigation, daily life on the ship, provisions, cargoes and voyages. The book contains an annotated list of the galleons sailing between the Philippines and Mexico from 1565 to 1815. This informative book is the first of its kind to cover such an expansive history of the Pacific galleons which up to this point had remained largely untold.
Shirley Fish is an American Freelance Writer and Researcher working in Asia since 1980. She has lived in South Korea, Hong Kong, Indonesia and is currently living in Manila, Philippines. Over the years she has been a magazine editor and foreign correspondent for various Asian publications. She has a Master’s Degree in Education from the University of Southern California. In 2003, her first book “When Britain Ruled the Philippines 1762-1764 : The Story of the 18th Century British Invasion of the Philippines During the Seven Years War,” was published in the United States.

pag-asaharibon:

The Manila-Acapulco Galleons by Shirley Fish

During the sixteenth to the nineteenth centuries, the transpacific treasure galleons sailed annually from Manila to Acapulco. In Manila, the vessel was loaded with the scented spices of the East, luxurious silks from China, exquisite hand crafted lacquerware from Japan and a multitude of Oriental goods that the Spaniards of New Spain longed to own. The returning galleon from Acapulco to Manila, carried as much as 2.5 million silver pesos in payment of the goods sent to the New Spain in the previous year, as well as a yearly silver subsidy of 250,000 reales for the maintenance of the colonial government in the Philippines. But while the galleons mainly sailed alone and unaccompanied from Manila to Acapulco and vice versa, they were vulnerable to a host of calamities and misfortunes. A fire on board the vessel or a terrifying storm could end the voyage and the lives of every one on the ship even before the galleon was able to reach land. Additionally, the commanders of the galleons were always threatened by lurking pirates and privateers who prayed on the vessels and coveted the treasures they carried. The book describes in detail how the galleons were attacked at sea and how they fought against enemy vessels, as well as how many of the ships sank or were shipwrecked over the years. It also covers their management, construction, manning, weaponry, navigation, daily life on the ship, provisions, cargoes and voyages. The book contains an annotated list of the galleons sailing between the Philippines and Mexico from 1565 to 1815. This informative book is the first of its kind to cover such an expansive history of the Pacific galleons which up to this point had remained largely untold.

Shirley Fish is an American Freelance Writer and Researcher working in Asia since 1980. She has lived in South Korea, Hong Kong, Indonesia and is currently living in Manila, Philippines. Over the years she has been a magazine editor and foreign correspondent for various Asian publications. She has a Master’s Degree in Education from the University of Southern California. In 2003, her first book “When Britain Ruled the Philippines 1762-1764 : The Story of the 18th Century British Invasion of the Philippines During the Seven Years War,” was published in the United States.

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

An American Civil War soldier from the South Sea

I was flipping through a number of U.S. civil war historical pictures in the internet showing Union and Confederate soldiers when a picture suddenly caught my attention. Most of the soldiers in the previous pictures were Caucasians and African-Americans but the soldier in this particular picture is obviously Asian.

I found out that the name of the soldier in the picture is Felix Cornelius Balderry—A Filipino! He belonged to Company A, 11th Michigan Volunteers.

Before the civil war, Balderry worked for a certain seafarer named Joseph Foster of Leonidas, Michigan. Balderry moved to the state of Michigan and worked as a farmhand before enlisting in the union army in December 7, 1863 at Kalamazzo.  With many other new recruits, Balderry joined the 11th in the field with the 14th Corps of Rossville, Georgia on January 28, 1864. He served in the western theater and was sent to the hospital at Nashville in June 1864 or 1865.

In the Atlanta campaign that followed, Felix Balderry fought at Buzzard’s Roost, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kenesaw, Ruff’s Station and the siege of Atlanta. He finished the war in Tennessee and was mustered out on September 16, 1865.

After the war, Balderry worked as a tailor in Colon, Michigan. He married 16 year old Ada May Barns in 1885 at Constantine, Michigan. A son, Frank, followed two years later. Felix Balderry passed away on August 18, 1895 of tuberculosis at the age of 49.

Basing from what I know, the first recorded history of Filipinos fighting as soldiers in the U.S. army was recorded back in 1815 when General Andrew Jackson mentioned of “Manila Men” that had fought alongside his defense of New Orleans under the command of Jean Baptise Lafitte.

[Sources:

Ateneo De Naga high school 1980

Association to commemorate the Chinese serving in the American Civil War]

See also: Filipino Veterans of the US Civil War

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

The Philcoa Overpass wall located in Quezon City, the largest city in Metro Manila, has been a site for several Gerilya's Bonifacio street murals.

KKK (Kataastaasang Kagalanggalangang Katipunan ng Bayan)

Anakpawis X Gerilya for Bonifacio Day 2012

Bonifacio formed the Katipunan, which was totally dedicated to the objective of overthrowing the Spanish colonial government through armed revolution.

SUPREMO

Bonifacio Day 149 Mural Tribute Version 2.0 2012

Bonifacio is best known in Philippine history as the Supremo of the Katipunan, the peasant army that launched the Philippine Revolution against Spain in 1896.

SIGAW SA PUGADLAWIN!

Boni150 murals Series 2013

Tumblr user I Write As I Write on the Myth of the Cry of Pugad Lawin.

(via fyfilipinopride)

Lean not on your own understanding, but rather acknowledge the Lord in all your ways and He will make your paths straight.

—Proverbs 3:5:6 (via laurenarlene)

(Source: riseupsir, via catholic-inspiration)